PATRICK PYLES

When I was about 7 years old my big brother took me to see Blue Water, White Death, the story of a group of adventurers seeking to film the elusive Great White Shark. The moment the film ended I remember saying, “I want to do that!”.

The film altered the trajectory of my life. Growing up I devoured books, magazines – anything so long as it was about sharks. The love of sharks blossomed into the love of the ocean.

In 1998 I became certified in scuba diving. A few short years later I met my childhood hero, Rodney Fox, and joined him for an adventure of a lifetime – cage diving with the mighty Great Whites of the Neptune Islands. Since then I’ve photographed 15 species of sharks, from speed demons like the Shortfin Mako to the toothy Sand Tigers that inhabit Cape Lookout.

No small feat for someone born and raised in Las Vegas, NV. As for making a living, I built a career in direct marketing, raising millions of dollars for cancer research hospitals, non-profits, and associations in Canada, Great Britain, and the U.S.

Now I’m retired and live in Palm Beach County so I can dive, dive, dive and hone my photography skills. I currently shoot a Sony mirrorless camera with a Nauticam housing.

As underwater photographers, I believe our pictures help tell the story of the oceans. And by doing so, inspire our young to become ambassadors for our oceans’ wildlife, just as a documentary did for me so many years ago.

When I was about 7 years old my big brother took me to see Blue Water, White Death, the story of a group of adventurers seeking to film the elusive Great White Shark. The moment the film ended I remember saying, “I want to do that!”.

The film altered the trajectory of my life. Growing up I devoured books, magazines – anything so long as it was about sharks. The love of sharks blossomed into the love of the ocean.

In 1998 I became certified in scuba diving. A few short years later I met my childhood hero, Rodney Fox, and joined him for an adventure of a lifetime – cage diving with the mighty Great Whites of the Neptune Islands. Since then I’ve photographed 15 species of sharks, from speed demons like the Shortfin Mako to the toothy Sand Tigers that inhabit Cape Lookout.

No small feat for someone born and raised in Las Vegas, NV. As for making a living, I built a career in direct marketing, raising millions of dollars for cancer research hospitals, non-profits, and associations in Canada, Great Britain, and the U.S.

Now I’m retired and live in Palm Beach County so I can dive, dive, dive and hone my photography skills. I currently shoot a Sony mirrorless camera with a Nauticam housing.

As underwater photographers, I believe our pictures help tell the story of the oceans. And by doing so, inspire our young to become ambassadors for our oceans’ wildlife, just as a documentary did for me so many years ago.

When I was about 7 years old my big brother took me to see Blue Water, White Death, the story of a group of adventurers seeking to film the elusive Great White Shark. The moment the film ended I remember saying, “I want to do that!”.

The film altered the trajectory of my life. Growing up I devoured books, magazines – anything so long as it was about sharks. The love of sharks blossomed into the love of the ocean.

In 1998 I became certified in scuba diving. A few short years later I met my childhood hero, Rodney Fox, and joined him for an adventure of a lifetime – cage diving with the mighty Great Whites of the Neptune Islands. Since then I’ve photographed 15 species of sharks, from speed demons like the Shortfin Mako to the toothy Sand Tigers that inhabit Cape Lookout.

No small feat for someone born and raised in Las Vegas, NV. As for making a living, I built a career in direct marketing, raising millions of dollars for cancer research hospitals, non-profits, and associations in Canada, Great Britain, and the U.S.

Now I’m retired and live in Palm Beach County so I can dive, dive, dive and hone my photography skills. I currently shoot a Sony mirrorless camera with a Nauticam housing.

As underwater photographers, I believe our pictures help tell the story of the oceans. And by doing so, inspire our young to become ambassadors for our oceans’ wildlife, just as a documentary did for me so many years ago.